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Sep 7 2018

Diesel Cars – Reviews & Pricing on New Diesel Cars, Edmunds, cheap diesel cars for


Diesel Cars

#25. GMC Savana

#23. Chevrolet Express Cargo

#21. Audi A8

#19. Audi A7

#17. Volkswagen Beetle

#15. Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

#13. Volkswagen Touareg

#11. Audi A3

#9. Porsche Cayenne

#7. Mercedes-Benz Sprinter

#5. Volkswagen Jetta

#3. BMW X5

#1. Audi Q5

2017 BMW 3 Series

2017 Land Rover Range Rover

#22 Chevrolet Colorado

#20 Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

#18 GMC Sierra 2500HD

#16 Nissan Titan XD

#14 Jaguar XE

#12 BMW X3

#10 Audi A8

#8 Audi A3

#6 BMW 3 Series

#4 Ford F-250 Super Duty

#2 BMW X5

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See reviews, specs, photos and inventory on diesel by your favorite make.

diesel car buying info

  • Market Segment
  • Price
  • Performance & MPG
  • Safety
  • Roominess
  • Cost to Own

The number of diesel vehicles on the market took a hit when Volkswagen Group was caught cheating on diesel emissions tests. As a result, there are currently no Volkswagen, Audi or Porsche diesel-powered vehicles on the market. Nevertheless, there are still plenty of diesel passenger cars and SUVs that do meet regulations ? and they’re good choices, too, with offerings from BMW, Chevrolet, Jaguar, Jeep, Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz. There are also diesel pickup trucks available from Chevrolet, GMC, Ford and Ram.

Diesel engines are generally more expensive to manufacture than conventional gasoline engines because of the extra measure of durability required to withstand the stress of high-compression diesel combustion, technology such as turbochargers that improve performance and additional exhaust treatment needed to ensure clean air emissions. As a result, the purchase price of a diesel vehicle is generally higher than for its gasoline-powered counterpart.

In the past, diesel engines were thought to be noisy, smelly things suited only for industrial applications, but advances in exhaust-scrubbing technologies have minimized these drawbacks. Much of the appeal of diesels comes from their fuel economy, which is typically better than that of their gasoline-powered equivalents. Sheer power can also be impressive, because lots of torque is available at low rpm, which makes diesel power preferred for towing. However, that low-end power also makes diesel-powered cars or SUVs feel considerably robust when accelerating around town.

Just as with gasoline-powered cars and SUVs, diesel-powered vehicles are fully equipped with modern safety features like antilock brakes, front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and stability control. Convenience features like rearview cameras and parking sensors are becoming increasingly available on non-luxury cars, while premium brands are utilizing high-tech electronics to warn inattentive drivers of blind-spot intrusion and impending collisions. Shoppers should be aware of crash-test scores, but it should be noted that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has adopted more strenuous testing procedures, so the ratings produced by some models in the past might not be directly comparable to new vehicles.

Interior passenger space depends on the model you select, but you’ll find diesel-powered models in a surprising number of market segments across the board. Those who need an extra row of seats will find SUV models attractive, especially since bigger, heavier vehicles are well suited to a diesel engine, which combines plenty of low-rpm thrust with good fuel economy. Heavy-duty pickups can seat anywhere from three to six people, depending on whether you choose a regular-, extended- or crew-cab model.

The diesel combines excellent fuel economy with a measure of added durability thanks to heavy-duty construction, but hidden costs can compromise the overall economics. First, the excellent mpg of a diesel can be partially offset by the higher price of diesel fuel (depends on where you live and current market conditions). Second, the greater durability of diesel hardware can be offset by the costs of maintaining the emissions hardware, which will most likely include a liquid after-treatment of the exhaust to reduce particulate emissions. Finally, minimal running costs can be offset by a greater purchase price for the engine itself. In the end, the appeal of the diesel equation depends on use, and if you’re after either extreme cruising range or pronounced towing capacity, the diesel could be for you.

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about diesel cars

Diesel-powered vehicles are nothing new: The use of this efficient engine technology dates back to the 1920s when it debuted for use in trucks. The first diesel passenger car, the Mercedes-Benz 260 D, was introduced in 1936. The diesel engine is named after its inventor, Rudolf Diesel. The diesel engine is also referred to as a compression engine because it basically squeezes a mixture of fuel and air until it ignites, instead of using a spark plug to ignite the mixture like a traditional gasoline engine.

Compared to a gasoline-fueled engine, a modern diesel offers three notable advantages: fuel economy, pulling power and longevity. For instance, a typical gasoline-powered V6 in a full-size pickup truck will average about 17 mpg in real-world driving. In comparison, Edmunds’ long-term Ram 1500 with a diesel-fueled V6 averaged about 23 mpg.

An abundance of low- and midrange torque makes diesels ideal for extreme hauling and towing duties, hence their popularity in heavy-duty trucks. And their reputation for incredible durability is the stuff of legend. Mercedes-Benz holds the record for diesel cars, with several lasting more than 900,000 miles, and a 2002 Ford F-350 Super Duty diesel pickup amassed an incredible 1,000,000 miles while still going strong.

Diesel-powered vehicles are nothing new: The use of this efficient engine technology dates back to the 1920s when it debuted for use in trucks. The first diesel passenger car, the Mercedes-Benz 260 D, was introduced in 1936. The diesel engine is named after its inventor, Rudolf Diesel. The diesel engine is also referred to as a compression engine because it basically squeezes a mixture of fuel and air until it ignites, instead of using a spark plug to ignite the mixture like a traditional gasoline engine.

Compared to a gasoline-fueled engine, a modern diesel offers three notable advantages: fuel economy, pulling power and longevity. For instance, a typical gasoline-powered V6 in a full-size pickup truck will average about 17 mpg in real-world driving. In comparison, Edmunds’ long-term Ram 1500 with a diesel-fueled V6 averaged about 23 mpg.

An abundance of low- and midrange torque makes diesels ideal for extreme hauling and towing duties, hence their popularity in heavy-duty trucks. And their reputation for incredible durability is the stuff of legend. Mercedes-Benz holds the record for diesel cars, with several lasting more than 900,000 miles, and a 2002 Ford F-350 Super Duty diesel pickup amassed an incredible 1,000,000 miles while still going strong.


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